•  
    Results 1 to 10 of 10

    Thread: Used Aveo checklist: specific things to watch out for / inspect when buying one

    1. #1
      Administrator MetroMPG's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Location
      1000 Islands, Ontario, Canada
      Posts
      3,987
      Thanks
      198
      Thanked 101 Times in 83 Posts

      Used Aveo checklist: specific things to watch out for / inspect when buying one

      If you were shopping for a used Aveo, what would be your top 5 Aveo-specific issues you would watch out for or inspect?

      E.G...

      1) Timing belt - this would be at the top of most people's lists for the gen. 1 car. Ensure it has been replaced, and/or inspect its condition (for dryness/cracking).



      2) Timing belt idler pulley - if it fails, the result is the same as a broken belt. UPDATE: avguy recommends changing all if you're going to do any -- a failed bearing in any will have the same bad result.

      3) Front suspension - worn strut mounts & control arm bushings can lead to noisy & sloppy front suspension.

      4) Plastic thermostat housing - crack and buh-bye coolant! Metal replacements are available.

      5) Automatic transmission: BTSI solenoid - trouble removing key from ignition. More info.

      6) Valve cover gasket leaks happen like clockwork, and plug wires go bad if they've been soaked in oil for any amount of time.

      7) Rusted-out strut tower doesn't show up here often, but it's a big deal because of the level and cost of the repair.

      8 ) Radiator/tranny cooler in 2009's has had multiple reports of leaking into each other.

      9) Bad coolant tank caps in 2010's has had multipe reports causing overheating.

      What else comes to mind? Post in this thread and I'll add to the list.



    2. #2
      Administrator Daox's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Location
      Wisconsin
      Posts
      2,321
      Thanks
      115
      Thanked 56 Times in 46 Posts
      Even if the timing belt isn't worn, the idler can fail (not uncommon), and you have the same result. So, watching the belt isn't the best way to inspect. Its probably best to replace it before the 60k change interval.

      The automatics had some shifter/switch problem that is somewhat common. I'l see if I can't dig up the large thread on that.

      Edit, found it. Its the BTSI solenoid. More info here:

      Replacing BTSI solenoid - fixes the unable to remove key from ignition problem

      Those are all issues with the 1st generation. The second generation issues seem to be more random, but feel free to add to the list.

    3. #3
      Administrator MetroMPG's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Location
      1000 Islands, Ontario, Canada
      Posts
      3,987
      Thanks
      198
      Thanked 101 Times in 83 Posts
      Added to the list.

      And yeah, if people want to specify generation/engine, I can make multiple lists.

    4. #4
      Almost time to do my timing belt
      Join Date
      Aug 2012
      Location
      Northeast
      Posts
      1,109
      Thanks
      2
      Thanked 66 Times in 60 Posts
      The advice I give is to replace all 4 first gen timing belt components every time. They all have bearings, and failure of any one of them has the same well-known outcome. I think this is is an easy call for a DIY, because the extra cost and time are small. For someone paying shop rates it might be another $100 or so, and some may opt out of the extra cost. But at least it makes everyone aware that all 4 components are important and need maintenance.

      Leaking valve cover gasket happens like clockwork, and plug wires go bad if they've been soaked in oil for any amount of time.

      Rusted-out strut tower doesn't show up here often, but it's a big deal because of the level and cost of the repair.

      Some posters don't change the auto tranny fluid often or at all. The drain plug makes it easy to swap 2 quarts every couple of oil changes or so.

      2009 has had multiple reports of radiator/tranny cooler leaking into each other.

      2010 has had multipe reports of bad coolant tank caps causing overheating.

    5. #5
      Administrator MetroMPG's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Location
      1000 Islands, Ontario, Canada
      Posts
      3,987
      Thanks
      198
      Thanked 101 Times in 83 Posts
      Thanks, avguy - list updated.

    6. #6
      Casual Roadtripper RicochetRandy's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2013
      Location
      Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
      Posts
      143
      Thanks
      0
      Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
      Metro, I almost feel the list should include links to helpful forum posts; if only to show newcomers pictures of what specific things are, so they could pop the hood and say "yup, t-stat changed... Not too much oil around the gasket...".

    7. #7
      Administrator MetroMPG's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Location
      1000 Islands, Ontario, Canada
      Posts
      3,987
      Thanks
      198
      Thanked 101 Times in 83 Posts
      Stellar idea. I'll dig up threads for the points made so far.

      People making any new suggestions: please provide forum links with your points.

    8. #8
      LXV-SCOOTADRIVE, ON! 2010AveoLT's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2012
      Location
      Dickson, TN
      Posts
      786
      Thanks
      78
      Thanked 61 Times in 51 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by avguy View Post
      The advice I give is to replace all 4 first gen timing belt components every time. They all have bearings, and failure of any one of them has the same well-known outcome. I think this is is an easy call for a DIY, because the extra cost and time are small. For someone paying shop rates it might be another $100 or so, and some may opt out of the extra cost. But at least it makes everyone aware that all 4 components are important and need maintenance.

      Leaking valve cover gasket happens like clockwork, and plug wires go bad if they've been soaked in oil for any amount of time.

      Rusted-out strut tower doesn't show up here often, but it's a big deal because of the level and cost of the repair.

      Some posters don't change the auto tranny fluid often or at all. The drain plug makes it easy to swap 2 quarts every couple of oil changes or so.

      2009 has had multiple reports of radiator/tranny cooler leaking into each other.

      2010 has had multiple reports of bad coolant tank caps causing overheating.
      I would like to make an Amendment to Avguy's Strut Tower Suggestion; the ones who Really need to watch for it are people in the Salt Belt States, pretty much everyone in Canada, as well as people living close to the Coasts, where their cars can be hit with Salt Spray.

      and as for the 2010s Coolant cap Problem, Mine was NOT Overheating, it was just losing coolant.

    9. #9
      Administrator MetroMPG's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 2007
      Location
      1000 Islands, Ontario, Canada
      Posts
      3,987
      Thanks
      198
      Thanked 101 Times in 83 Posts
      Everyone in Canada ... except British Columbia. (I'm envious.)

    10. #10
      JPD
      JPD is offline
      Should I keep it?
      Join Date
      Sep 2011
      Location
      Samut Prakan, Thailand
      Posts
      67
      Thanks
      0
      Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
      Here in Thailand, I use the air conditioner every time I drive. After 5 years of use, I went to the Chevrolet dealership after the AC wasn't cooling properly. I expected them to add some chemicals but instead I was told I needed a new AC compressor. Including labor and a new belt, the bill was 14,300 baht, USD $441. That probably won't make the top 10 list but it was a considerable expense that I wasn't expecting.
      Name:  20150317_180328.jpg
Views: 1010
Size:  281.6 KB
      To be honest, I don't even know how you would check this if buying a car and I don't know how long compressor units typically last for anyway.
      I agree with timing belt being top of the list. In Thailand, Chevrolet suggest getting a service every 10,000km or six months, whichever comes first. As I only drive 10,000km per year, I had the 60,000km service when I'd only driven 34,000km. They changed the timing belt then, despite it supposedly lasting longer. I then looked on this forum and it seems that US owners can go 60,000 MILES between changes, making me wonder what Chevrolet in Thailand are up do. It could be the heat and humidity here that shortens the lifespan but there are surely lots of places in the US with similar conditions such as Miami.





    11. The Following User Says Thank You to JPD For This Useful Post:

      dekapar (08-16-2016)

    Similar Threads

    1. What to watch out for when buying a used Aveo
      By MetroMPG in forum General Discussion
      Replies: 11
      Last Post: 12-07-2015, 10:29 PM
    2. Chevy's new finance company..Watch Out!!! Was GMAC now Ally..sharks!
      By DailyDriverMark in forum General Discussion
      Replies: 9
      Last Post: 11-03-2011, 11:54 AM
    3. Replies: 2
      Last Post: 03-20-2011, 06:28 PM
    4. a video every fwd car owner should watch
      By AVE0SAM in forum Open Forum
      Replies: 9
      Last Post: 01-24-2008, 12:46 PM

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •